One of those voices

Entertainment in the ’50s and ’60s was all about sound, not so much about images. The wireless played a leading rõle in family life, with the morning pips reminding us we were already late, the evening news gathering us together at 6 o’clock and favourite programmes on weekdays and at weekends. And in our house the cricket coverage was eagerly awaited, especially the voice of John Arlott.

So it was probably my generation of listeners who first welcomed what is now known as TMS; a sporting institution. Down the years Brian Johnston (sans the ‘e’) and his younger pupils have bemused and amused us every year.

But Henry Blofeld has been a star in the firmament, with erudition and wit we should hardly expect from a mere sport programme. And now he too is going to retire.

Thank you, Bloers!

By any other name

Stop calling it the Czech Republic! It’s Czechia! Just like Slovakia.

Yeah, right. And Holland? Or Taiwan? Or Belarus?  And Cologne? Or Calcutta! Not to say Copenhagen.

I know we can’t say Ayer’s Rock any more but p-lease! Potayto, potahto, tomayto, tomahto – who cares? Unless you want to talk about scones.

 

Scene and Herd

At my local convenience store today.

The hitching post and buggy parking spots have been there for a while and are often used (sometimes just to leave a deposit as evidenced), the electric car charger is new and as far as I know, unused.

A few captions spring to my somewhat biased mind:

Sublime or ridiculous

Charging or discharging

Bullsh!t or horsesh!t

Nonsense or horsesense

A view from Down-Under

OK, in common with several other Charioteers, I no longer have a vote in the UK – my citizenship counts for naught, except taxes.

And agreed, I am a long way away from the action – but I have read extensively on the subject and Boadicea remains close to the debate, as one would expect from a Doctor of Economic History from the LSE.

I have been impressed by the standard of debate on the Chariot, which has been streets ahead of the scare tactics and downright lies promulgated by many senior UK functionaries who really should know better.

But –

There is a limit to the applicability and validity of too much analysis – one can easily lose sight of the big picture by searching too assiduously for the devils in the detail.

So here is the summary of my conclusions –

Everyone should vote to leave the EU, because a vote to remain betrays the individual as either corrupt (cherchez l’argent) or terminally stupid.

I’ll get my hat.

Le mot juste? Possibly not!

I am well aware that our troop of Charioteers have many languages between them, some with great fluency.   I am, in comparison, a mere amateur in this game, but I love to dabble and, on occasion, play the pedant.

As an aside, before I get really stuck in, how’s your Indonesian?   Mine is very limited, but I was recently reminded that if an English-speaking person says “I am sorry”, it sounds almost exactly the same as an Indonesian-speaker saying “Ayam sore”.   Which can lead to all sorts of amusing outcomes, because – as I’m sure most of you know – it means “Chicken afternoon”.  Almost, but not quite, Chicken Tonight – remember that? Continue reading “Le mot juste? Possibly not!”