Sokozy – NOT Suzuki

Following a request by the Royalist I am giving you all an opportunity to learn the opening few bars of Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata through the revolutionary new piano playing method called ‘Sokozy’.  It is in fact so cosy that you only have to read (or memorise) the number sequence directly shown on the piano keys. (No more “lines and spaces” and no more squiggles and hieroglyphics.) The Moonlight Sonata is basically quite easy to transcribe in this way – for the most part the right hand is played by depressing single notes in triplet rotation.  For basic instruction see below.

Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata -Barno. 1
Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata – Bar no. 1

OK music lovers, here we go. Are you sitting comfortably?  The two ‘1’s on the left are played together with the left hand, using your  little finger and thumb. At the same time  as pressing the  two ‘1’ s on the left, you should depress the ‘1’ on the right with the thumb of your right hand.  After that you just continue pressing the number sequence 2 & 3, 4,5, & 6, 7, 8 & 9 and 10, 11, 12  (This triplet sequence in the right hand – 123, 456 etc – is best played using thumb, index finger and middle or 4th finger.)  It sounds a bit complicated in words but its dead easy just looking at the number sequence in the picture and just striking the numbers in ascending order. Easy Peasy Lemon Squeezy.

I’s sure many of you have an old upright somewhere in the house but for young Charioteers like Janus, well go out and buy a cheap digital 4 or 5 octave keyboard and have some fun.  Has anyone got a favourite song they would like to play on the piano. Just let me know and I will attempt to transcribe them (bar by bar) using the ‘Sokozy’ method and I’ll  post them here for you!

TIP  It is important to hold the two left hand ‘1’s down for the duration of the number sequence. In that way, the bass sound of the two notes (C sharp) add flavour to the harmonies of the right hand. Good innit.

By way of background, this began as an exercise in trying to help Sabina on the other side. Anyway I shall present Bar numbers 2-5 in the next day or so to enable the Royalist to have some resolution to any musical efforts he makes.    Click on the picture for a larger view and ENJOY!

11 thoughts on “Sokozy – NOT Suzuki”

  1. Soutie – if you think this idea might be used for any of your students then go ahead and tell me. I will be happy to transcribe simple tunes in this way.

  2. Had a quick bash on my Yamaha Piaggero and it works well. One question though. How do you indicate notes of different duration?. PS, I can read the squiggles and hieroglyphs, although not as well as I used to 🙂

  3. Aha Feeg – I’m working on that! At the moment this only works on regular beat tunes but it can easily be used by small children (or adults) to introduce them to the piano keyboard. NB I could indicate quavers by reducing the size of the font used on that ‘beat ‘ and similarly increase the font size on a note hold longer than a crotchet but that is far from ideal and only gives a rough idea. Another idea would be to use another symbol with the numbered key to indicate beat length other than a crotchet. Cor blimey this only started as a bit of fun! Of course it helps if one knows the tune before attempting to play it!

    I will take on board any ideas you have!

  4. Hi PapaG

    I guess if you restrict notes to minims, crotchets and quavers you put an underline under the number for a minim and strike-through for a quaver, or something similar That would, at least, allow for some tunes to be transcribed. Keep up the good work. 🙂

  5. I think music is made unnecessarily complicated by the notation system and could be simplified by a number system. I was covering a music class in school, this week. It did not begin well: one of the class walked out at the start and went walk about around the corridors, and the register, to be taken electronically, did not load. The lesson plan was also on the – computer, so we were delayed with getting the lesson going. The instructions were for the children to work in groups, choose a score and play through it on keyboards with headphones. For some of them – namely precocious girls, it was too easy. So we had lots of ‘Miss, can I go and get my own music from my locker…?’ To which, of course, the answer was ‘No’. (I already had one child wandering the corridors like a wayward meteorite in outer space.) But for others – boys – the lesson itself was totally and utterly incomprehensible. We had lots of ‘Miss, I can’t do it’ and ‘Don’t get it’ and so forth, accompanied by banging and shouting and hey listen to this, and people whacking on the drums on the keyboards and so on. So Iexplained that you could equate the notes with a number system. And guess what? It worked; the boys were happy; music was actually… made.

  6. Good morning PapaG

    I noticed your post as you published it yesterday morning but then went out, I’ve only now noticed your subsequent comment to me and kind offer, thank you.

    Actually we’ve had a similar system in place for quite a while now, I’ve dug out the original printed music sheets, they include We wish you a merry Christmas, Twinkle twinkle little star, Jingle bells and Happy Birthday among others 😉

  7. Greetings Obi-Wan PG,

    I seem to have mislaid my Bechstein Grand so I am torturing the tune on a cheap keyboard. It took me awhile to get the tempo right, I must have been playing the thrash metal fast mix of the tune. Now, I’ve got bar one in my back pocket. In a deviation from your rules I have been using the pointer, middle and 4th finger for the right hand 123’s.

  8. My – what big hands you have (said PapaG to the Royalist.)
    I will be posting bars 2- 4 later this afternoon and will also address comments made by Feeg, Bluebelle and Soutie. As for Janus, I will deal with him later.

    NB I have only just got in from a morning stint at HMP Holloway. Yes I play keyboards there at the C of E Service.

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