New world

In this season of reflection and hope for the future, I bring you some news from the Independent:

“Nasa has found a new planet outside Earth’s solar system that is eerily similar in important aspects. Scientists say the temperature on the surface of the planet is around 22 Celsius. Its star could almost be a twin of Earth’s sun. It probably has water and land. It was found in the middle of the habitable zone, making it the best potential target for life.”

The question is: what do you think would be its greatest benefit to homo sapiens? Somewhere to send his population overspill? A place for a new green civilisation? A nature reserve? Or an 18 million-hole golf course?

Finally, and here’s the big one: what would you call it?

Author: Janus

Hey! I'm back ...... and front

27 thoughts on “New world”

  1. Morning Janus

    How do we know that it’s not already overpopulated and that they don’t already have millions of pioneers headed this way?

    What to call it? How about planet π.
    (As in pi in the sky ;))

  2. Aaarrgh! my π is supposed to be the pi symbol, looks okay when I insert it but awful when posted. 😦

    With thanks to Bearsy that’s now sorted 🙂

  3. On one hand we have scientists telling us we are all going to die because the earth’s temperature is going to rise by 2 degrees over the next 100 years. On the other, they say they have found a planet that they say could support life even though it is 2.5 times the size of earth (you would have trouble withstanding the effects of gravity, I would imagine), that is 600 light years away and has a year of 290 days. because of its size, one pundit I heard, said that while its residents would be able live ‘quite happily’ there, they would have live under ground. If we cant cope with lousy 2 degrees, does anybody really think we will be able to overcome those challenges?

    Soutie I like your name for it.

  4. Well until a few years ago scientists thought no creature could live at certain sea depths, with high pressures or near hot water outflows, (Such as at hydrothermal vents – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrothermal_vent) but they have been found deep in the ocean in unexpectedly inhospitable situations.
    I think there is no reason to suppose that life may not have developed elsewhere outside the parameters of what we know on earth…. though that doesn’t make it habitable for us.

    Why should we take over someone else’s planet anyway? We haven’t learned to look after our own yet.

  5. Nym, I sympathise with your view but since the Earth’s population has doubled in my lifetime I fear that we’re running out of road. So assuming the natives of Pi are friendly, I’d give it a go, with prospective colonists selected by way of a global lottery, proceeds to Nasa.

  6. We could always stem our population growth as a quick practical solution. I thought a world wide flu may do that at some point.

  7. Janus, I was tempted to amend my comment #1 and describe the potential space travelers from planet π as π-oneers 🙂

  8. Soutie :

    Janus, I was tempted to amend my comment #1 and describe the potential space travelers from planet π as π-oneers :)

    An elegant term, Soutie! 🙂

  9. Interesting but pointless surely.

    Looking at the NASA site, Voyager has been travelling for 30yrs and covered 1/600th of a light year. To get a probe there would take 10,800,000 years at that rate.

  10. Having read some of the comments on this post, I think Pseu has it right:

    Why should we take over someone else’s planet anyway? We haven’t learned to look after our own yet.

    All joking apart, I’ve never understood the vanity of earth-kind in thinking that we are the only life-form in the Universe.

  11. Janus :

    Yes, Boa. The joke will be on us when a higher life-form arrives!

    I think it was Christina who suggested that Earth might be quarantined from the rest of the Universe until we grow up a bit more…

    In this case quarantine will not be 40 days – more likely 40 thousand years…

  12. Ferret :

    Interesting but pointless surely.

    Looking at the NASA site, Voyager has been travelling for 30yrs and covered 1/600th of a light year. To get a probe there would take 10,800,000 years at that rate.

    Who knows? Modern physics is getting weirder and weirder. It is a question if mankind or whatever supersedes them can last long enough to find out more about the universe without blowing themselves up!

    Maybe there is some lifeform already on its way here from planet Pi (can’t be arsed to muck about with fonts. 🙂 )

  13. FEEG,

    I am certain of two things in that department.

    a. There are absolute shedloads of populated planets out there in the big ol’ universe.
    and
    b. The ones who have the intelligence to develop interstellar propulsion are easily smart enough to leave us the hell alone.

  14. How long to get from here to there? Seemples: (T = 2 * sqrt[ D/A ])/31536000 years where T = transit time in seconds, D = distance in meters, A = acceleration in m/s squared, sqrt[x] = square root of x.

    Remember that the target is 600 light years away and that 1 light year is 9.4605284 × 1015 meters.

    Also remember that the ship is under constant acceleration for the whole trip time* and that prolonged acceleration at anything over 1g (9.81m/s squared,) is not a healthy thing for the average person, (though you ladies might be pleased to know that you can put up with it better than we poor males.)

    So there you are. The answer is that it would take a really, really long time 🙂

    *Yes, yes, I know, the ship has to flip over at the half-way point and slow down at the same rate and for the same time as it speeded up on the outward journey – but any change in velocity is an acceleration, innit?

  15. Bravo – It is a known fact here on Earth that wimmin make better fighter pilots than men because they are shorter and, erm, chunkier, than males and are therefore better able to withstand ‘G’ forces. I cannot argue with your maths because I wouldn’t know what I was talking about, but I am sure a XX chromosome holder will be the first on this planet of yours and therefore bugger up your plans. Such is life. 😀

    OZ

  16. Yes OZ,

    But it took us ages to teach them that the mirrors in the cockpit were for spotting bandits on yer six not refreshing the lippie. 😉

  17. Ferret – I used to honk at A Zangada for having to replace the vanity mirrors in the cars’ sun shields because they were worn out. Sadly, it is much the same with the NSW.

    OZ

  18. Oh, and for Bravo amd Ferret, God created Adam first because He just wanted him to be able to get a word in edgeways for once.

    OZ

  19. Oh dear OZ,

    I hear the naughty corner calling, just so you don’t feel lonely I will get myself sent there too.

    Can anyone tell me why they make ladies watches when there is a perfectly good clock on the oven?

  20. Ferret – Let us adjourn to the naughty corner together. (I have a portable barbie, steak and a rub).

    OZ

  21. I’ve got news for you lot.
    After ‘pi(e)’ was wrecked by their overblown, overgrown population ‘they travelled away for a year and a day to the land where the bong tree grows’
    Hhmm, like here?
    Who do you really think finished off all the dinosaurs?
    Forget all this overblown tectonic shit, our newly arriving ancestors ate them! And chucked the bones in a swamp!!! They had terrible manners.
    Been indulging in bad manners and telling lies ever since too!

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