17 thoughts on “Sennen Cove, Cornwall”

  1. Totally brilliant!
    I once took spousal unit to St Anne’s Head on the end of Pembs. during a storm, 100′ cliffs and he got soaked from the wave spray.
    Quite amusing, anyone from the USA has absolutely no idea how ghastly the NE Atlantic can be. They just do not seem to get this kind of thing anywhere there. Tidal reaches in the Pacific rarely exceed 8-10′!
    Get better in a bathtub! The big rollers in California are much more gentle and repetitive.

  2. Agreed Mrs O,
    Recorded wind speed in this storm was 90mph+ in gusts, it scarcely got a mention. Once delivered a yacht from Grenada to Bermuda, wind speed went from a steady 15 knots up to 55 knots and back again in the space of four hours, where this has been going on (and off) for six/eight weeks. This storm has been unusual in one respect, someone shot a video of a seal pup swimming in the main street! (It’s true, I promise)
    Re The north Adlantic, there’s good reason that WNA load line (winter north Atlantic) is the one that ensures the greatest freeboard of all the plimsoll lines.

  3. Interesting about the plimsoll lines, had no appreciation that they differed for different sea locations, but can quite see why.
    I’m afraid I tend to avoid boats as I get hideously seasick. Know plenty about oceans from the theoretical, geographical sense but bugger all in a practical way! Tend to putter about the coast studying wave cut platforms and the such and avoiding the water like the plague!
    I saw the poor seal, must have been a hideous shock for the poor creature being heaved inland by a wave and swimming up the high street. You realise being exposed to Top Shop and Iceland has probably warped him for life? Will need therapy for years!!

  4. Mrs O, love the Topshop/Iceland crack πŸ™‚ but this is Looe, and therefore we are deemed too small to be worthy of such shopping opportunities (thankfully)
    Re the plimsoll lines, the highest on the hull and therefore where the ship can be deepest laden is the TF mark (tropical fresh) F (fresh) S (summer) W (winter) and WNA. Hopefully, if you load the ship to F in fresh water she will automatically rise to the S mark when she enters salt water.

  5. Dept of boyhood memories: i lived in Hastings for two years (1050 -52) – and enjoyed winter wave-watching too. The Channel often gets in a lather – probably owing to the behaviour of the French.

  6. janus :

    jhl, I suspect Christina’s bath will soon bear plimsoll lines appropriate to the seasons in NW USA! :-)

    janus :

    Dept of boyhood memories: i lived in Hastings for two years (1050 -52) – and enjoyed winter wave-watching too. The Channel often gets in a lather – probably owing to the behaviour of the French.

    πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚
    Sea state description for this weekend in Met office terminology, going from Very High to Phenomenal. That isn’t a word they use very often!

  7. What a fantastic idea for the bathtub, ought to come preprinted on!
    Mind you they ought to have one painted on way above the others that says its the Lampedusa/Australia run for immigrant loading/sinking! I believe it must be positively mandatory to overload immigrant boats!

    Are you getting a lot of that sea foam? We used to gett hat stuff in S. Pembs, weird stuff.used to drive the dogs mad barking at it.

  8. janus :

    Dept of boyhood memories: i lived in Hastings for two years (1050 -52) – and enjoyed winter wave-watching too. The Channel often gets in a lather – probably owing to the behaviour of the French.

    So you were too early for William the Conqueror then? πŸ™‚

  9. Mrs O
    Saw a picture somewhere yesterday of a double decker bus with just the top of its roof showing above the foam on Plymouth Hoe. I’ll see if I can find it.

  10. Get on, a double decker bus lost in foam? The dogs would have had never ending conniptions, they used to freak out over a couple of feet of the stuff!

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