Exporting the NHS

I’m afraid I fell about laughing when I heard this one.

Exporting the NHS, to whom? Who would want it? Don’t they know that when people are paying for direct services they actually want service?  The first world already has better facilities and the third world can’t afford to pay anyway.  Do they seriously think that people will pay good money without a clean private room and bathroom ensuite? People who pay are used to getting direct specialist services without the intervention of GPs and quickly, like the next week latest.  As paying customers they expect fast, polite, efficient service and their choice of good food on an a la carte basis.  Can you actually see the NHS providing that little lot?

I swear I think those bloody olympics have caused brain damage!  Should they wish to export anything like the NHS it might be a good idea if they perfected the brand on the indigenous population first! At the moment they would be up to their necks in malpractice claims in the first week alone!  It seriously gives one the twitch even thinking about it, positively gob smacking in it’s idiocy!

Author: christinaosborne

Landed on one side safely.

27 thoughts on “Exporting the NHS”

  1. Hello Mrs O

    There are fortunes to be made here ( and elsewhere) in private healthcare, it’s a great idea, what are they going to do? Export our doctors back to us?

  2. I have to agree with Christina on this one. 60 years ago, the NHS was the envy of the world. I am not sure it is now!

  3. CO, good evening.

    I have, to date. never had anything less than excellent service from the NHS. I realise, of course, that that might be because I am lucky enough to live in Embra where we have an extremely high doctor/ patient ratio. Medics who came here to learn their art stayed to live and work.

    But I just can’t believe that the whole of the rest of the NHS, throughout the whole of the rest of the country is as bad as you paint it. Your view does not seem to accord with the vast majority of the personally-related experiences of my friends and family, wherever they live or lived.

    Of course, the NHS has its (please note the lack of an apostrophe when using the impersonal possessive pronoun and compare and contrast this with the penultimate word of your post) faults and failures, its worryingly and obscene excesses and its total embarrassments on occasion. No human institution is perfect. A lot of the NHS and what it has done and has stood for over the years has, however, not been rubbish.

    In my opinion. and in the main, the NHS has, on balance, probably not been a totally bad thing in the history of my country.

    Moving on, why do you clearly, continually and persistently hate my country in any area, at vitriolic length and quite so much? I know that you chose to move out. I do not believe that that gives you the right to continually insult those of us who choose to stay here and to celebrate our country and its successes.

    Which the Olympics was (or possibly were), whatever you think.

  4. I’m quite sure that those who can afford to pay for medical care expect all sorts of things and can get them. However, what about those who cannot afford to pay for medical services?

    It may be that some think that Free Medical Care is a luxury that no country can afford – they tend to be those who can well afford to pay for their own medical care out of their own resources. In actual fact no National system of Medical Care is free. It is funded by every taxpayer – and rightly so.

    It is my opinion, that a country cannot call itself ‘civilised’ if access to education and medical care is limited only to those who have the money to pay for it.

    It is also a fact that just as an ill-educated country will not thrive economically – neither will a country that has an ailing population… Even Edwin Chadwick, who set up the Work Houses in the 1830s with the idea that they would be so dreadful that no one would apply for help, rapidly came to the conclusion that many people could not work because they were sick – and established Voluntary Hospitals alongside his work-houses.

    Whatever its failings, and there are many, the NHS is a great institution – no one need die for lack of money and that’s how it should be. I know the difference in the treatment my mother receives in the UK and the lack of treatment her twin sister got in the US – and I know which I prefer.

    Certainly the NHS needs an overhaul. It might do well to look at the Australian model – whereby GPs are only paid when they actually see people, and very few prescriptions are ‘free’. But, on balance I think the NHS is a monument to Britain’s Social Conscience – long may it continue. A few other countries could do with finding the ‘heart’ to provide for its less fortunate citizens.

  5. John Mackie :

    Moving on, why do you clearly, continually and persistently hate my country in any area, at vitriolic length and quite so much? I know that you chose to move out. I do not believe that that gives you the right to continually insult those of us who choose to stay here and to celebrate our country and its successes.

    I found this comment somewhat unpalatable. Whilst I am a born-again, friendly, cuddly, non-contentious bear since my recent brush with the grim reaper, and have absolutely no desire to further irritate the elders of Edinburgh, I feel compelled to record a couple of observations.

    Christina is as entitled as any other Charioteer to express her opinions in her post. One may, or may not, agree with her, and all are at liberty to respond with opposing views, but that doesn’t alter the fact that she has every right to to call it as she sees it.

    Conversely, the Scottish view of events is not always the correct view; furthermore, the use of heathen dialect can become irritating for those of us that speak more regular versions of the language of Shakespeare.

    Finally, with tongue firmly in cheek and a broad grin – The London Olympics weren’t a patch on Sydney 2000. 😆

  6. I haven’t read any details of the plan, so I can’t express an opinion, but with reference to the sentiments expressed above by Mr Mackie and Boadicea; I agree with them wholeheartedly.

    Well said!

  7. If you have never tried private medicine you have no basis of comparison. The speed in which they treat conditions is quite amazing compared with the ludicrous waiting lists on the NHS.
    I for one am not willing to lay in a ward, I want privacy, cleanliness, politeness and fast attention as required.
    Not all NHS hospitals are delinquent, what is unduly worrying is that they are so spotty, some excellent others lazar houses within the same city. Too many horror stories by half these days.
    People think the NHS is wonderful and perhaps it was once. It is no longer so. Canadians have the same system and immediately they have a real problem and a decent bank balance where do you think they come? The USA, that rather says it all.
    Anyone who can no doubt provides themselves with medical insurance, I note the Priory in Brum does very good business.

    I do not hate the UK, i do dislike a lot of things there. The NHS, the immigrants, the parasites on the taxpayer. The supine acceptance of the indigenous population in accepting the crap the govt dishes out. CCTV everywhere. The immorality of peasants breeding on the state without benefit of matrimony. The smug silliness in thinking the rest of the world were impressed by the olympics, nobody understood the opening ceremony and nobody bothered to watch a bunch of superannuated past it singers of the finale. Spending so much money on such rubbish when the country is in such dire straits was ludicrous. Fortunately up country Wales is well behind the times and as a result positively charming still. I always pass through England as quickly as possible, never did like the place too much.
    Had I disliked the place so much I could have changed my nationality anytime since 1976, I haven’t, and were I widowed, I should return to upland Carmarthenshire like a shot, with private medical insurance intact!

  8. Yes, I agree, Ara.

    I have had very limited experience of private medical care, but I do know that, in an emergency I’d rather be in an NHS hospital than a private one in the UK.

    There are only ever going to be finite resources in an NHS which relies on contributions from the working population…. and maybe there is benefit in looking at alternative sources of income. We have, after all a rapidly expanding population of over 80 year olds and not enough youngsters in the work force….

    There will be a need for more highly trained medical / nursing/ other support staff, and my concern is that the existing staff could be spread even thinner than they currently are, unless training needs are robustly assessed and provided for.

  9. Hello, Nym.

    In an emergency I agree with you, if only because the private sector does not do emergencies! They cherry pick and they are fine for elective surgery, I grant you, but they will not insure you for any long term chronic condition. Even basic cover is almost unaffordable these days, and in the end, the same surgeons and consultants will treat you, even though your surroundings and food may be more luxurious.

    I have a limited experience of both, but the treatment I received was fine, and friends and relatives have had a very positive experience of both systems.

    Talking to my daughter who works for the NHS she would agree with your final paragraph. She is constantly frustrated by the lack of funding in her area of expertise, and how it impacts on patient care.

  10. Bearsy :

    I found this comment somewhat unpalatable. Whilst I am a born-again, friendly, cuddly, non-contentious bear since my recent brush with the grim reaper, and have absolutely no desire to further irritate the elders of Edinburgh, I feel compelled to record a couple of observations.

    Christina is as entitled as any other Charioteer to express her opinions in her post. One may, or may not, agree with her, and all are at liberty to respond with opposing views, but that doesn’t alter the fact that she has every right to to call it as she sees it.

    Conversely, the Scottish view of events is not always the correct view; furthermore, the use of heathen dialect can become irritating for those of us that speak more regular versions of the language of Shakespeare.

    Finally, with tongue firmly in cheek and a broad grin – The London Olympics weren’t a patch on Sydney 2000. :lol:

    Hi Bearsy. Good to see you returning to the fray, Looking forward to our clashing as we sometimes seem to do.

    Sorry you found my comment ‘somewhat unpalatable’. Your right, of course. Just as it is my right, I believe, to get fed up by CO going on and on and on and on at every opportunity about how rubbish our Olympics were.

    She is, indeed, entitled to her view. As, I think, am I,

    I don’t see how I complained about her entitlement to hold her views in any way. I just chose to disagree with her analysis and, admittedly, to suggest that I felt that there was a consistent course of conduct involved on her part

    For which I apologise. Not appropriate, Charioteer-wise.

    I really like CO, However much she might annoy me, she still reminds me of my mother.

    And. for the avoidance of doubt, I am not aware of the use of any ‘heathen dialect’ so far on this particular post.

    Moving on. she is still wrong about our Olympics just as, with respect, are you. We seriously kicked the Sydney Olympics into touch. In my opinion.

    Smiley things were probably involved in the creation of this comment.

  11. Insurance for long term medical conditions, even when those folk with those conditions keep themselves fit and well, is madly expensive…. you’re so right.
    Even elective surgery has its emergencies – unpredictable and unmanageable- so often the private hospital emergencies are quickly shipped to the NHS ITUs.

  12. pseu, except in London! There you can get private emergency. Abroad virtually all hospitals have private emergency. It is illegal to turn any away for lack of payment for emergency treatment, this is Federal law in the USA, the bill goes on the local property ratepayers. Contrary to rumour, people are not left to die in the gutter, but state hospitals in some places are pretty unsavoury but free if indigent.

  13. My only observation here on CO’s persistent ranting is that she is fortunate/clever/careful enough to be in a position to pay for her comforts. Others aren’t. Britain is fortunate to have lost her as a detractor.

  14. Janus your socialist spleen is rather silly. How many law abiding, tax paying, non parasitic citizens does a country have to lose before it starts feeling the pinch? To wish such as myself further in any quantity is called fiscal suicide especially when replaced by parasitic immigrants.
    We are careful enough to pay our medical insurance bills, they are not small at our age but we find the money on a monthly basis as do millions of other responsible citizens. There is no luck or cleverness about it.
    As someone who has used/observed both medical systems since 1976 I suggest that I am actually more able to comment than most here. It appears that most UK citizens fail to appreciate that the holy cow of their NHS has actually got the staggers.

  15. Whatever your opinion of the NHS, Tina, and your experiences of both medical systems, I think that to suggest the US system is somehow superior is going to be an impossible task! It would appear that the US spends more per capita on their mish mash of a system than any other of the developed nations, by a long way, but still fails to deliver adequate healthcare to about 40 million of its citizens.

  16. Correction, I understand that some of the 40 million are not in fact citizens, they are “non-citizens”, so they are probably illegals. They are, however, human beings.

  17. Actually A I am not saying that at all. I do not think the USA superior in that 40 million have limited access to medicine. What I am saying is that the NHS does not do a good enough job in the UK to think of exporting their model. Many countries have a more successful model, Switzerland, Germany and Taiwan come to mind.
    I just fail to understand why the UK thinks that the NHS is worthy of export. Of course, in the kingdom of the blind the one eyed man is king! Most successful systems insist on all citizens paying into a direct personal dedicated insurance system which lies on a state minimum system. It is the model Obama was trying (unsucessfully) to introduce here and already exists on the continent.
    I just think that the UK has taken leave of its senses thinking the holy cow of the NHS is worth exporting in its present state of ineptitude. Beams and motes come to mind.

  18. Well, as I pointed out earlier, this is already happening on a small scale and the US export medical expertise too.
    The target area seems to be the Gulf and the Middle East, which makes sense. The best of both systems are renowned worldwide, so I see no reason why this should be a problem.

  19. PS. I agree that many there are far better systems to be found, overall, but as I said above the best of the US system and the NHS are very very good.

  20. Unfortunately there are not enough good doctors to lose. The UK is already beset with too many doctors from the 3rd world who have dubious language and medical skills. They will not be wanted in the middle East, they will want the UK’s best, (most of whom have already done residencies at John Hopkins I might add!) Who will be left to do the real work in the UK? Too many of the UK’s specialist hospitals rely on the skills of a very, very small number of doctors who have been lured back by large payments from the NHS. There is a system at centres of excellence whereby senior surgeons are paid £250,000/annum with freedom to do whatever they like BUT no private patients. £250,000 is a very good salary in the UK but would be peanuts in the Gulf. Lose those people and centres of excellence become non existent. This system is not exactly advertised is it in the UK? The vast majority never see inside of the hospitals where they ply their trade. Royal Marsden, The Royal Orthopaedic Brum and QEII Brum are three hospitals that work on this system to my knowledge. The very hospitals that want to set up overseas departments!
    Join the dots and follow the money!!!
    You are being sold a pup!

  21. I take your point, but all this hospitals and top consultants also train staff, and there seems to be as yet no information as to how this system would work. I don’t think we are being sold anything at the moment, it seems it was suggested by the previous government and is now being opposed by them!

    I have no idea, frankly, how this would work, or if it would be feasible. The plan, what little has been revealed, seems to be a money making exercise, any revenue to be ploughed back into the NHS.

    If it happens on anything like a wide scale, which doesn’t seem to be the intention, I would be surprised.

  22. Oh I’m quite sure it will be a money making exercise!!!
    For whom is the real question.
    By the time the so called hardship payments are made to staff for working in rat holes, a portion to the companies that run it and their native partners who must be used by law in the middle East the fabulous salaries to the top notches, the profit margin remitted back to the UK will be miniscule for what the people of the UK have actually lost, the expertise of the centres of excellence. After all, these people already use the services of these hospitals privately, the rich from those countries already fly in to Western Europe for medicine. Why take the mountain to Mahommed when the UK is already getting a take on these private patients?
    I find the whole thing exceptionally sniffy!

    Anyway, got to go, thanks for the conversation.

  23. To be fair to the NHS the doctors and nurses are really good, if there is an emergency then I would rather be seen here than almost any where else in the world.
    Where we fall down badly is the general everyday care, cleaning and running of the hospitals by thieving trust bosses.
    Having recently been going to Truro to see Ma in Law who is in an isolation ward and Truro being a hospital in trouble, I am really impressed with the care and diligence of the staff.
    However if I go sick and want to see a doctor I have a minimum of a 14 day wait (this happened last month) needless to say by the time the appointment was approaching I was better. Cuts waiting lists I suppose and my dear doctor can earn his 140k for not seeing me but having me on his books (useless fart).

    If training is so bad here then why do most of the doctors around the world want to get their degree here? because our training is among or possibly is the best in the world.

  24. I was having a whinge to my brother the other day about the NHS. I had been suffering from a cough from the day I arrived in this country. After about 6 weeks, I was beginning to get irritated. He suggested that I go see a doctor. I laughed at the idea. I have always found NHS doctors to be worse than useless. He defended them saying that system was very good when it really mattered. I had to concede to him on that point. I am still alive and ergo one could argue that on the relatively rare occasions where I have been to see a doctor, I must have been malingering. My cough cleared up a couple of days later.

  25. CO, “Janus your socialist spleen is rather silly.” I’m not surprised you label decent, human attitudes as ‘socialist’. There is no equivalent label for someone on the opposite side of the circle like yourself, except perhaps, indecent and inhuman.

Add your Comment

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s