Been rather busy of late

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After such a bad spring there has been much work to catch up.

It has always been my habit to have friends over for afternoon tea when the roses are in full bloom.  Needless to say it nearly always rains on the chosen day!  For once, it didn’t and last Sunday went off without a hitch and much cake manufacture.

They got lucky, the strawberries had produced well and they got to eat the lot.

Unfortunately or fortunately, however you look at it I have a bit of a reputation for my English roses, they are near to impossible to grow here due to climate, they become beset by blackspot, bugs, laxity, rot, wind blast, mould, you name it, they get it.  However, I refuse to go without my roses, so they are on the most strict chemical regimen that woman can devise. I have got it down to a fine art over the years, their schedule is marked on the calendar and adhered to with a religious fervour!

Now for the bad news, next Wednesday I have over 150 people from the garden clubs descending on me to inspect the garden as part of one of the Whatcom tours. I was inveigled into this in the spring, I wriggled womanfully trying to evade the whole thing, but the bloody woman who organises it assailed me at every turn and she took a mumbling partial assent as a definite yes.  Now this bunch coming are the really anal brigade, weeds not allowed, grass combed, paths licked, leaves polished type of people.  Not your usual British gardener types at all at all.  Needless to say I have been rather hard at it removing the evidence of my sloth of late.

As I have already entertained my friends to our great mutual satisfaction I rather hope it rains on the rest of them! Of course to make matters worse, my gardening assistant has buggered off to Alaska for the summer but to be fair and to my surprise an lot of the ‘tea se’t have offered to come in on Friday and help me with last minute jobs.  Time to check the quantity count on the potables!

None of this has been made easier by my voluntary involvement with a community garden in Everson. I have another veg garden 30′x20′ elsewhere to look after  3 miles up the road. My excuse being that someone had to show them how to grow vegetables properly!

Author: christinaosborne

Landed on one side safely.

25 thoughts on “Been rather busy of late”

  1. A perfect English country garden, simply beautiful, what else can one say, except, I’m envious.
    You’ve done a bloody good job Christina, you should be very proud.

  2. Could we have a closer pic of the cars next time, this one intrigued me, it’s not a Chrysler Voyager is it? The wheels look far to small to be useful. Years ago we had an Isuzu 4×4 bakkie (truck)range with the back built in, since discontinued, how I regret not buying one.

    (click pic for larger image)

  3. “….they are on the most strict chemical regimen that woman can devise.”

    In your particular case I shudder to think what goes on in that garden. Lovely results, though:-)

    OZ

  4. Oz, I have to use a triple systemic for bugs, moulds and fertiliser, another slow release fertiliser because our soil is too porous, manure and Epsom salts to stiffen the old wood. They are the only plants to be so treated, Everything else is either native or well adapted to the moisture and the veg are strictly organic. Most people plant roses here and they are dead within 2 years, they don’t know how to prune them either.
    Rose growing here is treated as almost a cross between witchcraft and alchemy and gawped at with bated breath, so to speak. You have to get almost down to Portland before they are the usual piece of piss and no real effort.
    I am EXTREMELY careful as to the use of chemicals as we are in the catchment of a salmon river! I NEVER just throw stuff about, all measured and applied with great care. I never use herbicides or gobs of nitrogen because of the river.

  5. Soutie it is a Ford aerostar or so spousal unit advises me!
    In my book if its got four wheels its a car!!!

  6. Christina, is that the spousal unit in the maroon shirt, about to skulk behind the tree? He looks very nervous!

    Good for you. Lovely garden and a lovely blog. I am not much of a gardener. Scratch that. I am no gardener at all but I enjoy other peoples’. My sister and brother in law have a beautiful garden in Hampshire. Very large and quite formal. I was over in England in May and I have never seen it look so beautiful, though my sister was whingeing flat out about the lack of rain. But I am not sure about formal gardens. On one hand they remind me of childhood books ‘The Castle of Yew’ for example, and one has expectations of mazes and hidden crannies, but sometimes they seem a little contrived. (Well of course they are!) In many ways I enjoy an informal garden more. Again stating the bleeding obvious, they are more spontaneous.

  7. Lovely, Christina. I won’t have roses that require spraying, but I do miss the scent!

  8. Pretty impressive slideshow, CO, but have you actually looked at your post?

    I appreciate you are busy, and you have reproduced this here from an original post on another site, but could you not have edited out the references?

    PS. I’m amused that knowing your utter hatred of “things pink”, you have managed to include quite a few examples thereof in your slideshow.

  9. Pseu :

    Lovely, Christina. I won’t have roses that require spraying, but I do miss the scent!

    Just out of curiosity …. What kind of roses don’t require spray and why? and why then do they have no scent?

    I’m no gardener .. just curious 🙂

  10. A great little piece Christina. I am no gardner, either, but I admire those who are – you make life just that little bit better for the rest of us.

    Good luck when the mob descends – I think you’re actually relishing the chance to show the buggers how to grow roses! 😀

  11. Sipu, “……I enjoy other peoples’.” Shouldn’t that be ‘other people’s’? 🙂

  12. CO, I empathise with your missionary zeal, showing the natives the true path to horticultural heaven. We British (see, I don’t mind your Welshness that much) know about ‘smart-casual’ gardens, combining formality with comfortable relaxation. As for your veg patch, THAT’s a fence!

  13. Janus :

    CO, I empathise with your missionary zeal, showing the natives the true path to horticultural heaven. We British (see, I don’t mind your Welshness that much) know about ‘smart-casual’ gardens, combining formality with comfortable relaxation.

    What’s wrong with a concrete slab covering an entire back yard? 😦

    🙂

  14. Beautiful garden, Christina.

    The only place that roses grow really well in Oz is in South Australia… They grow all year round. They even managed to survive my lack of gardening skills!

  15. Whilst I admire and like formal gardens in the correct settings and with the right architecture I find them too tricky by half in rural settings like here. With mountains and forest right at the back door so to speak,
    the environment does not benefit the hard landscaped look, garden ‘art’ or too many straight lines. The jumbly jungly school of garden design fits the place far better in my estimation.
    One of the things I avoid like the plague is cut edges to borders, they look absolutely ridiculous. I eschew the machines and pluck them by hand to give a much softer outline.

    PS the fence round the veg is for the benefit of myself versus the deer.
    Sipu, yes that is spousal unit creeping off behind the tree in maroon shirt.

  16. Donald :

    Janus :

    CO, I empathise with your missionary zeal, showing the natives the true path to horticultural heaven. We British (see, I don’t mind your Welshness that much) know about ‘smart-casual’ gardens, combining formality with comfortable relaxation.

    What’s wrong with a concrete slab covering an entire back yard? :-(
    :-)

    Donald, is that the ‘in’ thing in Uraguay then? 🙂

  17. I love concrete! Grass yards get too mushy and wet in the rain and all those flowers in a garden bring unwanted species such as bees, spiders, hornets, snakes, snails and ……. 🙂

    flowers belong in pots 😦

    🙂

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