Another Aussie success

Sam Stosur has just beaten Serena Williams in the quarter-finals of the French Open. She’s had a great tournament so far and would be a worthy champion. This also means that whichever lady picks up the trophy will be a “newbie”, now that both the Willams sisters and Justine Henin are out. It’s time women’s tennis had some fresh, younger faces at the top.

Bearsy, I realise you are more interested in cricket, but there are other sports…

20 thoughts on “Another Aussie success”

  1. Wots sport?

    they all need to go home and do their gardens, watching weeds grow is a world class sport!!!

  2. I’m like you, christopher, always happy to see Venus and Serena beaten. Women’s tennis needs a decent world No 1 and I don’t think Jelena Jankovic is up to it, so go for it Sam.

    Christina, isn’t pulling the blighters up more fun?

  3. I’ve always enjoyed tennis, playing and watching. Now there’s a Scot in the Top Ten, it’s even better, though at times he has the same consistency as the Scotland rugby and soccer teams. No wonder I have high blood pressure!

  4. Christina – I have to admit I would rather watch the Sheila than watch a weed grow, even if she is a bit chunky in the thigh area and a bit skinny “up top” for my taste.

    Am I still allowed to say that?

    OZ

  5. Evenin’, Sheona – Would that be the same Scot with a personality akin to an open grave who is also a “plucky Brit”, but only when he loses? Smiley thing.

    OZ

  6. OZ you can say anything you like from a cave in Portugal!
    since when did we indulge in PC round here?

  7. I’ve never encountered an open grave, OZ, so cannot comment on their personalities. We Scots are only ever Brits when we win. When we lose we’re Scots. Apparently some French commentators at the French Open were calling Andy Murray “l’Anglais”. No wonder he lost! Definitely a “casus belli” there – or at least a Glasgow Kiss. I’d be interested to read your comments on some of the Williams sisters’ outfits now.

  8. Christina – Can I assume “spousal unit” has no say in this?

    🙂

    OZ

  9. Sheona – Oddly enough, it’s the other way round in Ingerlund. When the curly-haired sulk wins, he’s Scottish and when he loses he’s the “plucky Brit” – probably because it’s hard to find an English accent on the BBC!

    Don’t sweat “l’Anglais” thing. Most continental languages refer to “England” when talking about the UK – probably historical perceptions, I suppose. 🙂 In Portuguese, for example, Inglaterra is the word usually denoted for the UK, whereas Grã Bretanha is rarely seen.

    OZ

  10. I have my French friends well-trained, OZ. Just this afternoon at the end of our reading group I was asked about emnity between England and Scotland. We’d been reading a book set in the last days of French Algeria, so I was at least able to reassure them it wasn’t that bad. I’ve always found that I get a good reception when I tell people I’m a Scot, whatever country I’m in.

  11. Ah, Sheona – Vive “the auld alliance” and the Scots’ craving for French claret. Historically, the English much preferred port wine from Portugal. 🙂

    OZ

  12. O Zangado :

    Ah, Sheona – Vive “the auld alliance” and the Scots’ craving for French claret. Historically, the English much preferred port wine from Portugal. :-)

    OZ

    Hence the fact that Port houses generally have English names. I prefer port, myself — a good tawny any evening will do.

  13. Vis a vis referring to Britain as England, a similar fallacy exists with regards to The Netherlands which is often called Holland. Holland is only a region in the western part of that country.

    “Port became very popular in England after the Methuen Treaty of 1703, when merchants were permitted to import it at a low duty, while war with France deprived English wine drinkers of French wine. The long trip to England often resulted in spoiled wine; the fortification of the wine was introduced to improve the shipping and shelf-life of the wine for its journey.”

  14. While on the subject of the English and their love for port, it should be pointed out that one of the most famous of all Port shippers and the largest in the Douro is the Symington family (Graham’s, Warre’s Dow’s) whose ancestors hailed from Scotland.

  15. Sipu :

    Vis a vis referring to Britain as England, a similar fallacy exists with regards to The Netherlands which is often called Holland. Holland is only a region in the western part of that country.

    “Port became very popular in England after the Methuen Treaty of 1703, when merchants were permitted to import it at a low duty, while war with France deprived English wine drinkers of French wine. The long trip to England often resulted in spoiled wine; the fortification of the wine was introduced to improve the shipping and shelf-life of the wine for its journey.”

    Two regions, actually — North Holland and South Holland.

  16. In the days of Empire, of course, the Monarch endeavoured to create ‘North Britain’, reflected in the name of a hotel at the Edinburgh terminus of the railway from London. Luckily England surived the threat to its domination and so did Scotland.

  17. Sipu :

    While on the subject of the English and their love for port, it should be pointed out that one of the most famous of all Port shippers and the largest in the Douro is the Symington family (Graham’s, Warre’s Dow’s) whose ancestors hailed from Scotland.

    Sipu, true indeed.

    Symington was a Scot as were both Sandeman and Cockburn. Haven’t been able to check but Dow and Graham sound pretty Jockish to me as well.

  18. christophertrier :

    Sipu :

    Two regions, actually — North Holland and South Holland.

    Nearly right. The region of Holland is divided into two provinces, North Holland and South Holland. But what is a little pedantry between friends?

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