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Snowdrops

snowdrops-04-03-17

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Categories: Gardening, Photography
  1. March 5, 2017 at 2:26 pm

    Nice, minus 10C here this morning, creek frozen right across. I blame Donald Trump.

  2. March 5, 2017 at 3:10 pm

    Positively beastly weather here. Rainy and blowy. I nearly lost my umbrella during my first three-mile walk.

  3. March 5, 2017 at 3:10 pm

    Nah, it’s brexit 🙂

  4. March 5, 2017 at 3:19 pm

    JL: I maintain it’s Alex bloody Salmond.

  5. March 5, 2017 at 3:31 pm

    A balmy 7 C here with weak sunshine over the beechwood. Whoever is responsible, keep it coming!

  6. christinaosborne
    March 5, 2017 at 4:54 pm

    Going from just above freezing to mid 40’s during the day. Lots of rain, windy, snow mix. A very late spring.
    Lovely to see the snowdrops janus. One of the first things I did here in this new garden was to plant early bulbs. I dug up a couple of clumps of snowdrops from the old place and they have been flowering for weeks. Planted newly, crocus and early miniature iris, all flowering already. Such a welcome sight in a dreary spring.

    Massive panic, ran into a log jam in production in the greenhouse. Needed to move things on into the cold frame but a broken pane from the evil winter. Both of us are dying from dreadful colds we caught at the Seattle flower show ten days ago, (bloody filthy place full of wogs and queers, a wonder we only caught colds!) So quite incapable of doing it ourselves, can hardly stand upright. Thank heavens my gardening help came and fixed it in 20 minutes flat! So my parsley starts and early mange tout peas have now been evicted from their pleasant alternative universe for acclimatisation.
    And potting of sweet peppers and onions can carry on apace their root development was getting critical.

    A tip for growing early peas for any of you that try.
    You plant them in the ground and virtually nothing comes up! For an early crop one plants them in Feb/March according to area, however, at this time of year burrowing rodents are desperate for food, Peas, un-germinated are carbohydrate rich and are treasure trove for mice and rats. Immediately they germinate the carbohydrate changes biochemically into a protein of virtually no interest to the rodents So, you pre plant them in 4″ pots, five to a pot, and grow them in safety till they are3-4″ high, then harden them off and immediately the weather gives you a break plant them out, butted up hard in a trench. Eh voila, an instant row of peas. Works a charm. I induce much envy at the allotment with my peas, but not being a creepy sort I always teach people how to do it themselves. Might be a bit more effort but the crop justifies it.
    27 pots, a tray and a half here = a 9′ row, quite sufficient for a family of 4.or freezer! Succession sowings at will, they are not generally attacked for food as much as the earlier crops when times er’ard for mice.

    Can I blame Donald Trump too please?
    Not quite what for, probably broke my cold frame glass deliberately! An unutterably heinous crime.

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